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Drupal Association Journey: Pedro Cambra: DrupalCon is coming up!

10 hours 47 minutes ago

DrupalCon NorthAmerica starts tomorrow, but it is still not too late to register! There will be quite interesting content and networking activities and there’s a Drupal Association Q&A session where the floor is going to be open for the community to reach out the DA board and staff.

I’ve requested to be on the line up and I’ll be participating, so if you have any questions, please take your chance!

I don’t have a massive amount of updates from this last weeks regarding my board participation. I’ve been attending the Community and Finance committee meetings and there are some outcomes from there that I’ll be publishing about soon.

I’ve requested that the board minutes page is updated more often, and I’ll remind this to the person in charge of doing so.

I am preparing some proposals that hopefully will be addressed to the board regarding some considerations and process on the disenfranchisement non Drupal association in the elections issue. I hope to have updates on that too.

Note: This blog has the comments disabled, please feel free to send me a message through my contact page if you need to discuss anything related to the community and the Drupal Association. You can also tweet at me or find me in Drupal Slack or the distributed matrix network as pcambra.

#Drupal

The logistics players that know how to deliver for ecommerce

11 hours 55 minutes ago
Every day, 100k+ smart people read our newsletter. You can sign up here. Hello readers, This week’s visual story looks at the logistics and ecommerce services behind Southeast Asia’s booming online economy. While this space isn’t well covered by tech media, it’s no less exciting, in my opinion. Legacy players and young startups alike are […]
Betty Chum

hussainweb.me: Thriving on Chaos in Drupal

17 hours 39 minutes ago
Today, I want to share my thoughts from a book passage related to Drupal. The book, Everyday Chaos by David Weinberger, is largely about how chaos is the new reality in today's machine-learning-driven world. In this book, Drupal is discussed in the chapter on strategy and possibility where it is contrasted with more traditional methods of product development and organizational vision. The book is amazing and insightful, and the section on Drupal was a welcome surprise.

This startup raised money to fight competition in China

1 day 11 hours ago
Every day, 100k+ smart people read our newsletter. You can sign up here. Hello readers, Indonesia-based logistics firm J&T Express’ US$2 billion late-stage funding round was the largest deal to take place in Southeast Asia this week. What’s interesting is that the capital injection comes ahead of a potential US listing for the company, which […]
Nathaniel Fetalvero

hussainweb.me: Drupal Podcasts (and some PHP ones)

1 day 17 hours ago
Today's DrupalFest post is on the lighter side. I am just going to talk about some of the podcasts I listen to related to Drupal, PHP, and software development in general. I'll try to cover all the Drupal podcasts I know about. Let me know in the comments if I have missed something. As for others, I am just listing those I listen to.

Matt Glaman: Watch: Nightwatch testing training to help get Olivero stable for Drupal 9.2!

1 day 18 hours ago

I am a little late getting this blog published. The end of March and early part of April just blew right past. However, I wanted to share the recordings from the Nightwatch.js training I gave at MidCamp on March 25th. I showed folks how to run Drupal's Nightwatch.js test suite locally, with DDEV and Lando.

The workshop code is available on the Bluehorn Digital GitHub organization, with documentation. I plan to develop this for all future testing workshops and keep it open for folks to learn from outside of paid workshops. In fact, the repo runs GitHub Actions to test the various setups and executes Drupal tests – the tests run tests to test that the tests can be tested! 😵

Community Working Group posts: 2020 Year-in-review for the Drupal Community Working Group

2 days 5 hours ago

The past year has been a busy one for the Drupal Community Working Group (CWG), as we created a new "Community Health Team" and saw the stepping down of the last original member of the Conflict Resolution Team, George DeMet. As the CWG enters its 8th year, we feel it is our duty to continue to pursue our mission to "foster a friendly and welcoming community for the Drupal project and to uphold the Drupal Code of Conduct". With this guiding principle, we have been focusing on both proactive and reactive tasks to help us achieve this goal. 

This annual report will serve as a summary of what we've accomplished over the past year, as well as a discussion of some of our goals for the near future.

Community Health Team

The Community Working Group was expanded during the first half of 2020 with the creation of the Community Health Team. The mission of this new team is to focus on proactive community health tasks including workshops and knowledge transfer. With the help of Tara King, the CWG membership coordinator, we structured the team into several groups. Although team members may do work across multiple groups, each of these groups is designed to, but not limited to, focus on a specific area:

  • Community Event Support - provide resources and support related to the Code of Conduct for Drupal events.
  • Community Health - provide opportunities to educate and train community members to be more effective contributors.
  • Membership - to help identify and recruit community members for the CWG. 
  • Ambassadors - provide expertise and advice related to geographic, cultural, and other differences both inside and outside the Drupal community.

Community Health Team members are not privy to Code of Conduct incident reports; however they must adhere to the CWG Code of Ethics.

Once the team was created and volunteers were found for the majority of the roles, we began having monthly meetings during the second half of 2020. The team has already completed a number of tasks including:

  • Initial work on a Drupal Code of Conduct update.
  • Documentation of CWG roles.
  • Development of a group of community health representatives from other open source communities.
  • Ongoing Code of Conduct contact workshops.
  • Updates to the Drupal event Code of Conduct templates and playbook.
  • Ongoing Mental Health First Aid workshops for community members.
  • Blog posts related to community health.
  • "Nudges" for Drupal Slack Workspace and issue queues.

Other, long term goals for the Community Health Team include providing an on-ramp for the Conflict Resolution Team and identifying and presenting additional community-health-related workshops for the community, 

Conflict Resolution Team

After six years on the Conflict Resolution team, including several years as its chair, George DeMet retired from the team at the end of 2020. We cannot understate how much of an impact George has had on the CWG and the Drupal community, often working behind the scenes. We are fortunate that George has agreed to stay on as a member of the Community Health Team where he will be focusing on updating the Drupal Code of Conduct. 

During 2020, in addition to the creation of the Community Health Team, the Conflict Resolution Team continued to work on on-going and new Code of Conduct related issues. During our weekly meetings, we generally work on three types of tasks:

  • Internal business - examples include recruitment, public blog posts and presentations, Aaron Winborn Award, event organizer requests.
  • External, old business - ongoing conflict resolution tasks normally brought to us from community members.
  • External, new business - new conflict resolution tasks, normally brought to us from community members.

While some conflict resolution tasks can be resolved quickly (a few days), we normally have several long-term, on-going issues that can take anywhere from weeks to months to resolve. Most of the long-term issues include ongoing personality conflicts within the community, but we also routinely work with community members who had previously had their community privileges limited on plans and tasks to have those privileges restored (see our Balancing Accountability and Compassion in the Drupal Community blog post).

What types of conflict resolution issues do we work on?

We decided to perform a quantitative analysis of the number and types of conflict resolution issues we work on, comparing data from 2019 with 2020. Our methodology allowed us to assign one or two of the following categories to each new issue we received during 2019 and 2020:

  • Social media conflict
  • Issue queue conflict
  • Drupal Slack workspace conflict
  • In-person Drupal event conflict
  • Virtual Drupal event conflict
  • Not CWG domain
  • Other - examples include content issues on Drupal.org, issues related to local Drupal communities (but not directly related to an event), interpersonal issues occurring in areas not covered by any of the other categories.

In terms of overall number of incidents, while 2019 had 35 total new reported incidents to the CWG, 2020 has slightly less than half of that, with 17 new reported incidents. 

  • While the number of incidents occurring at in-person Drupal events dropped from six in 2019 to none in 2020, this doesn't account for the entire reduction of total incidents between 2019 and 2020. We also saw fewer social media and Drupal Slack workspace conflicts, but the biggest drop was in the "Other" category, which saw a decrease from ten incidents in 2019 to just two in 2020. 
  • Obviously, the drop in in-person incident reports is directly related to the pandemic.
  • What else can we attribute the dramatic drop in incident reports to? We hope that the formation of the Community Health Team is having some effect, but we're not so naive to attribute the entire decrease to its creation and actions during 2020. 

2019

2020

Total number of new reported issues

35

17

Social media conflict

7

1

Issue queue conflict

9

9

Drupal Slack workspace conflict

5

1

In-person Drupal event conflict

6

0

Virtual Drupal event conflict

0

2

Not CWG domain

4

3

Other

10

2

Looking forward Conflict resolution team membership

One of the primary goals of the conflict resolution team in the first part of 2020 was expanding the size of the team. With the recent departure of George DeMet and the decrease in our workload (thanks to fewer incident reports and the amazing work of the Community Health Team), we decided this was a good time to recruit new team members. 

We had six amazing community members approach us about joining the team, and will be inviting a new member(s) to the team in the next few weeks. One of the main goals of the Community Health team was to provide an on-ramp to the Conflict Resolution Team. Those community members who were not extended an offer to join the Conflict Resolution Team will be asked to join the Community Health Team in a capacity of their choosing, if they haven’t joined already.

As part of the process of having new members join the team, we implemented (and are in the process of documenting) a new on-boarding process, where new team members are considered "trial members" for a maximum of 5 months. During this period, new members will mainly shadow the team and have limited access to historical conflict resolution reports. At the conclusion of the trial period new members will either become regular members or be asked to leave the team. As is prescribed by our charter, all trial members must be approved by the CWG Review Panel

Community Health Team

Now that our Community Health Team is a year old and has some experience under its belt, we have high hopes that they will continue to be a force for good in the community. Our plans for the next year include finding and presenting additional workshops, completing the aforementioned Drupal Code of Conduct update, and assisting with the expansion of the yet-to-have-a-good-name group of community health volunteers from various open source communities.

Jacob Rockowitz: To Drupal or not to Drupal…The Webform module’s pickle of a sustainability problem

2 days 12 hours ago

My pickle of a problem

Previously, I have discussed my current work situation, which revolves around the fact that my organization is moving away from Drupal. This situation has led me to ask the question to Drupal or not to Drupal. To date, I’m committed to helping them migrate from Drupal to Sitecore.

I’ve also decided to remain committed to the sustainability of the Webform module. The “sustainability” of the Webform module has different meanings to different people and organizations within the Drupal community. Individuals want to know that there are resources available to provide guidance, review patches, and commit code to a project. An organization using Drupal and the Webform module wants to know that the code is stable, maintained, and secure. For me, I’d like to see compensation for my time in return for my continued commitment to the sustainability of the Webform module.

Being compensated to contribute and maintain code within an open source project can take on many forms. An organization could sponsor my work on the Webform module. At the same time, these opportunities are rare within our community. Frankly, assuming that a single organization could take on the responsibility of something like the Webform module might not be financially feasible.

Stepping back from my problem, there might be a more general solution for improving the Webform module’s sustainability. Still, sustainability is a pickle of a problem for an open source project like the Webform module.

The Webform module’s pickle of a problem

The pickle of a problem around the Webform module, Drupal, and Open Source is that people assume that everything is free. Open source code is free to use and distribute. The ecosystem built around the Webform module reinforces the notion that everything is free because we rarely put a “price tag” next to our...Read More